Available courses

Explore the definitions, organizational structures, and operational processes of tour operators and travel agencies. Learn about tour product development, itinerary planning, negotiation strategies with service providers, tour costing, and the essentials of tour planning for seamless execution.

This is a place for students to get extensive listening in the form of podcasts on topics related to class textbooks and other relevant themes.

The ultimate objective of CE courses is to prepare students for upper division courses at MIC. Students must achieve minimum scores on standardized exams from outside bodies in order to proceed to their junior year. This typically requires successfully taking three CE courses. By the end of each course, students will have mastered the knowledge and skills specified in the prescribed textbook as well as any supplemental materials provided by individual professors.

Philosophy is an ancient subject and an important one. The great philosophers have shaped the way we think about ourselves and the world around us. Philosophers ask fundamental questions, and while in everyday life, we take their ‘obvious’ answers for granted, in philosophy, we stop to think about them and to carefully analyse answers. This course provides an introduction to philosophy and to the kinds of questions it asks and answers. Students will examine and reflect upon some of the most central questions in metaphysics, philosophy of mind, epistemology, and ethics, such as: What is space? What is time? What is consciousness? Can computers think? What is knowledge? Can we be certain of anything? What makes an action right or wrong? Can we get morally lucky?

The aim of this course is for students (1) to gain basic knowledge of some of the most central ideas and core problems in philosophy, (2) to develop analytic and critical thinking skills through gaining familiarity with philosophical method, and (3) to be able to utilise basic philosophical terms and concepts.



 Radically transformed economics education can contribute to a more just, sustainable, and democratic world in which future citizens are empowered by a new economics to understand and debate how best to address pressing societal problems. 



Explore the diverse meanings and types of tourism, unravel the classifications of tourists, and delve into the expansive scope of the tourism industry and its products. Investigate the advantages and disadvantages of tourism, gaining a nuanced understanding of its impact on economies, social, and environments. Through engaging lectures and discussions, discover the multifaceted nature of tourism and its significance in shaping global travel experiences.

This is the moodle for LAS 105. You can find resources and upload assignments here.

This is Ellen's class for Academic English. We will use the book Q Skills for Success book 3 B. It is good for learning critical thinking! Look forward to seeing you in class.

This is the moodle for CE 3-3. You will find some assignments here and some extra resources for things that we do in class. Please ask if you have any questions.

This is the course moodle for Introduction to British Culture and Language taught by Ellen Head. The activities include reading, vocabulary and watching you tube videos as well as chatting to your partners about what you know and want to discover about British culture and assignments in which you find out something and present what you found out in a small group.

Hello everyone! 

My name is Rebecca Schmidt and I will be your Academic English instructor.  Let's have a good time reading and writing, learning vocabulary, and discussing interesting stories. My goal is to help you learn to love reading and writing and see it as an endless adventure of knowledge and imagination.  Another goal is to help you develop good learning strategies and study skills that will further help you study English on your own for a lifetime. 

I look forward to getting to know all of you better. 

We will use the textbook Q Skills for Success: Reading and Writing 4B

The link to online practice is here: https://q3e.oxfordonlinepractice.com/
The class code is XXXXXXXXXXX
You must complete the online work as part of your course grade. Deadlines will be at the end of each unit.  Students who do the online work slowly throughout each unit will get a much higher score on exams. 

Please get used to using an English-English dictionary. Please avoid translators for learning new words. I recommend using Longman's Learner's Dictionary https://www.ldoceonline.com/

You may email me anytime at rschmidt@miu.ac.jp.  My office is room 1-401. My office hours are Mondays 2:00- 5:00.  If you want to meet at another time, please email me. It is very important that you read your emails!!

Although I try to answer emails as soon as I can, I cannot promise to respond immediately to emails sent after 5:15 and before 8:30 or on the weekends.  You may send them, but please be patient if the reply takes time.  

I am looking forward to getting to know you even better.

Let's make learning fun!

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of Canadian culture and language. The syllabus is divided into two main sections: 70% focused on cultural aspects and 30% on language learning. Through interactive lessons, discussions, and real-life type experiences, students will gain valuable insights into some of the societal aspects of Canada's rich heritage, traditions, and language.


The course introduces students to basic features of the English language (listening, pronunciation, spoken fluency, vocabulary, grammar, discourse competence, politeness) and evaluates how different study methods can be used to make improvements in these areas.

The course will serve as an introduction to linguistic topics such as phonology, phonetics, and speech perception and their applications to the the teaching of pronunciation.

Topics of study include:

■Classification of speech sounds
■How differences in phonology contribute to difficulties in pronunciation
■The shortcomings of English spelling
■Second language (L2) phonological theories
■English pronunciation teaching methods

Academic English (AE) is a four-skills course focussing on Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP), or academic proficiency (see references below). The courses are offered every semester at different CEFR levels.

Continues proficiency development in written and spoken English. Strengthens oral proficiency through various speaking exercises. Develops reading skills through intensive and extensive reading practice. Strengthens written proficiency through practice in organized multi-paragraph essays. Further develops structural accuracy and fluency using more complex forms.

 

The course develops fluency in basic oral expression through various active learning methods such as pair-work, brainstorming, group discussions, games and activities, role-plays, presentations and active listening. Students are expected to record conversations focusing on a main functional objective with minimal planning and notes while utilizing conversation strategies.

This second semester course continues to challenge students to develop their reading skills through the use of in-class timed readings and comprehension questions, intensive readings with comprehension and vocabulary building activities, and extensive reading conducted mostly outside of class time. Homework consists of reading for meaning, for pleasure, and for the purpose of vocabulary building. Students also engage with software to work on extensive reading, to develop critical reading skills, and to build and practice vocabulary.


The course develops fluency in basic oral expression through various active learning methods such as pair-work, brainstorming, group discussions, games and activities, role-plays, presentations and active listening. Students are expected to record conversations focusing on a main functional objective with minimal planning and notes while utilizing conversation strategies.

This course introduces the literary genres – prose (short stories), poetry, and drama – with an emphasis on developing reading, speaking, and writing skills through the analysis, interpretation, and production of fictional texts. Our emphasis will be to experience literature using active, co-operative methods in order to learn how to respond to literature in ways that are both critically informed, expressive and creative.


This first semester course focuses on developing reading skills through the use of in-class timed readings and comprehension questions, intensive readings with comprehension and vocabulary building activities, and extensive reading conducted mostly outside of class time. Homework will consist of reading for meaning, for pleasure, and for the purpose of vocabulary building. The overall goals of the course are to increase reading fluency, to improve understanding of grammatical forms and vocabulary encountered in simplified written texts, and to gain skills and strategies necessary for further development of reading comprehension. It is hoped that students will also develop an increased interest in EFL reading.

Introduces initial basic proficiency in fluency and accuracy in spoken English. Develops fluency in basic oral expression. Develops reading skills through regular reading practice. Introduces writing skills form the paragraph level. Introduces vocabulary for academic purposes.

The course develops fluency in basic oral expression through various active learning methods such as pair-work, brainstorming, group discussions, games and activities, role-plays, presentations and active listening. Students are expected to record conversations focusing on a main functional objective with minimal planning and notes while utilizing conversation strategies.


Introduces basic theories of economics. Topics covered may include: economics as a science; production, specialization and exchange; demand and supply; elasticity; utility; output and costs; industry structure; factor markets; business cycles; national output and macro-economic policies; market failure; and international trade.

Contemporary Design

For 2nd-Year students submitting:

Area Studies - 7500 words
Independent Study - 3750 words
English - 3750 words

Upload your work here

This course examines contemporary issues in the English-speaking world. Students will learn to evaluate such issues, compare them with their own societies, assemble evidence from other sources, and express their own views in a written format. For language development, the course builds on the skills required in the academic writing course. Students learn to use sources of evidence to support their writing on common issues in the English-speaking world. They learn to use quotations and paraphrases, summarize texts and avoid plagiarism. The use of citations and references as a standard feature of academic writing is addressed. Vocabulary, grammar and written fluency are also reinforced.

This course is designed for all second year students in the fall Study Abroad on Campus program requiring a minimum TOEIC score to continue on with upper division courses at MIC. 

Surveys the masterpieces of Japanese Art from pre-history to the present, emphasizing the interplay between Japanese and Chinese cultural traditions.

Through comparing and contrasting Japanese and international/ traditional and contemporary art, JAC 204 encourages students to develop a critical awareness of the roots and evolution of some of the greatest works of Japanese art.


This course examines contemporary issues in the English-speaking world. Students will learn to evaluate such issues, compare them with their own societies, assemble evidence from other sources, and express their own views in a written format. For language development, the course builds on the skills required in the academic writing course. Students learn to use sources of evidence to support their writing on common issues in the English-speaking world. They learn to use quotations and paraphrases, summarize texts and avoid plagiarism. The use of citations and references as a standard feature of academic writing is addressed. Vocabulary, grammar and written fluency are also reinforced.

Students read texts that are related to the cultures of English-speaking countries around the world, especially the USA, the UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. The learning goals include increased reading comprehension of academic English texts, habitual use of a number of reading strategies, mastery of certain grammatical and lexical forms, increased reading fluency and the acquisition of dictionary skills.

The goals of English 3 are to further develop oral fluency and accuracy in academic settings. In particular, students will complete tasks based around the topic of cultures of the English-speaking world. The course continues practice in listening skills, pronunciation practice, conversation management and fluency development. Students will also learn and practice using grammar objectives and vocabulary.

Ethics is a field of study which concerns itself with the question of how one should act in a given situation: What is right and wrong? What is morally good and evil? In a wider sense, ethics seeks to answer the question first posed by Socrates: How may we live the morally good life? This course provides a comprehensive introduction to ethics. Students will examine and reflect upon some of the most central questions in moral philosophy, such as the following: What are the major ethical theories, and how do they relate to the varied kinds of moral problems that confront us in our lives? What reason is there for one to live a moral life? Is there one universal moral theory or are morals specific to particular cultures or even individuals? Is the rightness or wrongness of an action tied to its consequences? Is pleasure the only moral good or is virtue also central in determining morality?


The aim of this course is for studentss (1) to attain a basic understanding of a range of moral theories, (2) to gain a critical outlook regarding their approach to moral issues, (3) to be able to employ ethical concepts, (4) to be able to analyse the moral implications of real life issues, and (5) to gain a greater appreciation for the cultivation of basic human values such as personal responsibility, tolerance, and integrity.


This course provides an introduction to logic, the systematic study of reasoning and argumentation. The primary aim of this course is to teach students basic but essential skills of analysing, evaluating, and constructing arguments, and to hone their ability to execute these skills in thinking and writing. Students will be equipped with the tools necessary for clear, coherent, and effective reasoning in both academic and professional contexts. The course improves students’ skills in logic by making explicit the basics of reasoning and argumentation and by connecting them to various issues and situations in everyday life. We will discuss basic concepts in logic, essentials of propositional logic including translations into a formal language and truth tables, natural deduction in propositional logic, and common fallacies in reasoning.


The aim of this course is to enable students (1) to identify and analyse arguments, detect implicit premises, and reconstruct arguments, (2) to understand the basics of propositional logic including translations into a formal language, truth tables and natural deduction, (3) to detect common fallacies in reasoning, and (4) to present arguments clearly in speech and writing.


This is the latest updated course for Contemporary Social Theory with Dr Fabio Bolzonar.

Explore the dynamic relationship between tourism and information technology in this introductory course. Learn about tourist statistics, types of information technology shaping the industry, and the roles of online booking systems, mobile applications, social platforms, and review websites. Discover emerging trends in smart tourism and virtual tourism, gaining insights into their impact on destination management andtraveler experiences.

This is the course moodle for English Through Presentation and Debate. The aim is to improve your speaking skills and confidence. You will find assignments and links here.

This course examines various themes, approaches, and genres in American literature, and relates this literature to its historical, cultural, and social context. We will explore the literature of the early twentieth century. 

This course will focus upon important and representative works of American literature in their historical and cultural contexts. We will focus on poetry and prose that provide insight into the literary and intellectual climate to which each work belongs.

We will begin by exploring the colonial origins of the United States and its colonial literature. We will move to examine American literature in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. We will be looking at some of the major historical and cultural events in American history, such as the American Civil War, and asking how literature may be involved within them. We will read a lot throughout the course and think critically about the texts, which is to say, we will analyze the texts and interpret meaning from them. The class examines the work H. D. Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Fredrick Douglass, Langston Hughes, Willa Cather, W. E. B. Dubois, and Toni Morrison